By Ahmed Qurie

With new talks within the heart East Peace approach approximately to start, the shadows of prior negotiations fall seriously throughout all concerned. during this strong and soaking up testimony, considered one of major figures of the Oslo talks, former best Minister Ahmed Qurie (‘Abu Ala’) takes us in the back of closed doorways and contained in the negotiating rooms of Wye River, Stockholm and Camp David, the place the phrases of peace and a Palestinian nation have been sketched out, argued over, and finally misplaced. higher than existence figures emerge from the mins of those dramatic meetings-- published the following for the 1st time. Qurie recounts either the Israelis’ intractability and the dynamic contained in the Palestinian camp with candor and perception. This fundamental first-hand account presents a very new point of view at the background, matters and personalities that might make certain the way forward for the center East. 

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Beyond Oslo, The Struggle for Palestine: Inside the Middle East Peace Process from Rabin's Death to Camp David

With new talks within the heart East Peace method approximately to start, the shadows of past negotiations fall seriously throughout all concerned. during this robust and soaking up testimony, considered one of prime figures of the Oslo talks, former top Minister Ahmed Qurie (‘Abu Ala’) takes us in the back of closed doorways and contained in the negotiating rooms of Wye River, Stockholm and Camp David, the place the phrases of peace and a Palestinian nation have been sketched out, argued over, and finally misplaced.

Extra resources for Beyond Oslo, The Struggle for Palestine: Inside the Middle East Peace Process from Rabin's Death to Camp David

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On 17 May 1999, in the Prime Ministerial election called by Netanyahu, the new leader of the Israeli Labour Party, Ehud Barak, won a convincing victory. My first meeting with Sharon During Netanyahu’s period in office, once we had taken stock of what we faced, we felt we should take the diplomatic initiative. Our weapons were the prevailing popular Palestinian unrest, the moral pressure on Israel from its allies to implement its commitments, and a generally favourable international situation. Over time, the balance of international opinion was tipping increasingly towards us, thanks to Netanyahu’s recklessness.

Withdrawal took place in fact from Gaza, Jericho, populated areas, and parts of Hebron. Then we agreed on an additional redeployment which has not yet been carried out and whose absence has left us with a real problem. Second, we agreed that security must be put in place, both for the Palestinians and for Israel. The objectives and philosophy are clear. Unfortunately, acts of violence have led to many setbacks and more effort must be made. Third, both sides accepted the gradual construction of the Palestinian entity.

We have accepted the partition of Palestine, and we cannot now accept the partition of the West Bank. Sharon: It was you who rejected the UN partition resolution. Abu Ala: Last time, we lost. This time, we shall both lose. We do not want to argue about who won and who lost. I just want to explain to you the frustration we feel. Sharon: In 1938, when I was ten years old, a plan to partition Palestine was rejected, although it was better than the 1947 plan. Then Britain issued the White Paper in 1939, allowing 75,000 Jews to arrive in the country over five years, but it was rejected.

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